UW Medicine Artwork

UW Medicine Artwork


NARRATOR: UW 360 is
proudly supported by Pacific Office Automation,
copy, print, work flow, and IT. Problem solved. KATHERYN MARTIN: There’s
so much to look at. SPEAKER 1: Tucked inside one
of the country’s top trauma centers lives an
unexpected treasure, an impressive
collection of artwork. KATHERYN MARTIN:
I do find myself stopping to look at the art. And if I see something that
I think is absolutely amazing I take a picture and I send it
to my sister who is an artist. SPEAKER 1: Katheryn Martin is a
long time patient at Harborview who’s on the waiting list
for a kidney transplant. She’s been traveling
these halls for years and is still surprised and
delighted by what she finds. KATHERYN MARTIN: Every corner
of that hospital there’s art, and there’s something to
see and be surprised by. SPEAKER 1: Here at Harborview,
art is everywhere– where you eat, where you walk,
tucked behind wheelchairs and medical carts, overhead. PEGGY WEISS: Here is one. SPEAKER 1: Even under
head, literally woven into patients’
lives in these hand embroidered pillow cases
called the Dream Project. PEGGY WEISS: And so you can rest
your head easily on this pillow and have a pleasant dream and
wake up better in the morning. SPEAKER 1: Peggy Weiss is the
director of the UW Medicine Art Program. PEGGY WEISS: Every piece. I love every piece. SPEAKER 1: Every
piece is thoughtfully selected and displayed
by Peggy and her team, including these works by
UW professor of ceramics and beloved local
artist, Akio Takamori. PEGGY WEISS: It really
just dignifies patients. It makes patients feel like
somebody here understands them and cares enough
about them to make sure their environment is
appropriate and welcoming and wonderful. DR. PETER ESSELMAN: I like the
symmetrical patterns to it, I like the colors. SPEAKER 1: As the chair of
rehabilitation at UW Medicine, Dr. Peter Esselman is
continually impressed by the healing power of art. DR. PETER ESSELMAN: I
think it has an impact on patients and families more
than we would even recognize. SPEAKER 1: Kimberly Koenig
was definitely inspired. KIMBERLY KOENIG: This
collar was to protect my neck after the surgery. So I say that Harborview
saved my neck. SPEAKER 1: Now healed
and at home, she shows us how she was inspired
by the artwork at Harborview to transform her
once despised neck brace into a
bejeweled crown which now adorns a floor of the
hospital to hopefully inspire other patients. KIMBERLY KOENIG:
This is a symbol of strength, transformation,
healing, treasure, and health. SPEAKER 1: Just down the
hall from Kimberly’s piece, Katheryn Martin admires
one of her favorite works. KATHERYN MARTIN: When you
think about the journey that the turtles
make to reproduce and the fact that they’re
carrying the babies, it just seems to be
very kind of nurturing. SPEAKER 1: A nurturing respite
in an unexpected place, helping soothe the soul
so the body can heal. KATHERYN MARTIN: It
makes you feel valued, because art is valuable. And when you have
something to look at besides the walls and your
illness, it is quite healing.  

Dereck Turner

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