Top 5 Best Drawing Tablets – 2018-2019

Top 5 Best Drawing Tablets – 2018-2019


There are a lot of drawing tablets out
there, but which one is best for you? I’ve made that decision as easy as possible by creating a list of the top five tablets
to buy in 2018. That’s coming up next. Thanks for joining me today,
I’m digital artist Aaron Rutten and it is my mission to help
folks like you enjoy digital art and learn some new skills along the way. I’ve used and reviewed a lot of tablets… UC-Logic, Huion, Ugee,
Microsoft, Wacom, Apple. I’ve used the least expensive tablets and I’ve used the most expensive tablets. As a professional artist, I use a tablet all
day every day for work. I use tablets to create illustration, graphic
design, 3D, photo editing, video editing and more. So you can feel confident that my
top five choices are based on hands-on experience with a background in professional art
and design. But even though I’m currently a full time
artist, I haven’t forgotten what it’s like
to be a beginner or a starving artist. That’s why I’m going to start with some
inexpensive tablets without screens and I’m going to work my way on up
to the most expensive display tablets. Quick disclaimer, this video is not sponsored, this is my honest opinion about what I would recommend. So let’s go ahead and take a look at the top
five tablets of 2018. Starting with number five,
we have the Intuos Art medium. This is the previous generation of the Intuos, but it’s still a great tablet, and you might be able to find one for pretty cheap. So this is a great option
for budget-minded artists or beginners. The Intuos Art comes in two sizes, small and
medium. Now, in my opinion the small is too small
for large-gesture drawing. It is adequate for small-gesture tasks, such
as photo editing, 3D, and note taking. There are some differences between the Intuos
Art and the newer Intuos 2018 model, but I’ll talk about those in just a second. Moving on to my number four pick, this is the 2018 edition
of the Wacom Intuos. It’s very similar to the previous generation
with a few key differences, but basically they look about the same, they have about
the same pen, about the same surface. The difference is that
the previous Intuos Art had touch where you
could zoom in and out and pan your page around
and things like that. This version, the 2018 version,
does not have that. However it has over
4000 levels of pen pressure and it has built-in Bluetooth wireless,
depending on which model you get. If you’re a beginner
or someone who’s on a budget who’s looking for a great
entry-level tablet, this is it. And again, you want to get the medium version if you’re going to be doing a lot of drawing because it’s nice to have a lot of gesture
space to be able to draw. You’ll feel very cramped and confined on the
smaller version. Moving on to number three,
we have the Intuos Pro. This is a more professional version of a tablet
without a screen. It has a better pen that can support pen tilt. It can also use other types of Pro pens that
can sense rotation. You can use a lot more different kinds of
nibs. There are more express keys than the entry-level
tablets. Express keys can invoke commonly used
shortcuts and commands which is very helpful and time saving. There’s also interchangeable surfaces, since some people prefer smooth or rough surfaces. Now I will mention that there’s a lot of complaints about the Intuos Pro eating nibs. And I want to clarify that nib wear is normal. The nibs are the tips of your pen and are going to wear down
just like they would with a regular pencil. Some tablets wear down nibs faster than others, but that’s because some tablets
intentionally have tooth or grain so that the surface isn’t
too slick. A lot of artists prefer drawing on canvas
or paper because there’s a bit of friction. And unfortunately, because friction
is a property of nature, something has to wear down when
you rub two surfaces together. Either the nib has to wear down or the tablet
has to wear down, so which would you prefer? This is why there’s an option for
interchangeable surfaces, and if you prefer the smooth surface so that your nib doesn’t wear down as quickly
you can choose that. You can also get Flex Nibs which wear down
a lot less quickly as well. So you do have a lot of options
if nib wear is your primary concern. Now again, you’re going to want the medium
or the large size because it’s going to feel
a lot more comfortable to draw on. There’s also an Intuos Pro Paper Edition which you can draw on with a regular ink pen on paper. And it can collect all that information
and convert it to digital, and then you could color it on your computer. So it really bridges
the gap between traditional and digital drawing. There are two generations of the Intuos Pro, there’s the first generation and second generation. The second generation has built-in Bluetooth
and a few other differences. Moving on to my number two pick we have the
Wacom MobileStudio Pro. This is a display tablet with a built-in computer, so inside of this display is a Windows 10 computer. It can run anything that Windows
can run… Photoshop, Krita, Clip Studio Paint, Corel Painter, ZBrush, you name it. This is perfect for artists who like to work
outside the studio, and personally I absolutely love it
for painting outdoors. Similar to the Intuos Pro, you can use Wacom’s
professional pens that can sense rotation and tilt. It also has touch so you can control zooming
in and zooming out, and moving your page around. Some applications even allow you to tilt the
canvas and let your paint drip in different directions. There’s an optional stand that you can get
for the back. It has express keys on the side. It has a 4K resolution screen, which is one
of the highest resolutions you can get on a display tablet. And the pen has over 8000
pressure levels. However, due to the relatively small screen
size and hardware that will
eventually become outdated, this is not the absolute best option. That’s why my number one pick is the Cintiq
Pro. Now the Cintiq Pro comes in a 13, 16, 24,
and 32 inch model. There are also previous generation Cintiqs,
such as the Cintiq 27QHD, which is what I’m using. The Cintiq is awesome because it’s large, and it gives you the ability to harness the power
of your desktop or laptop computer, making this the best drawing tablet experience that money can buy. The huge screen gives you lots of room to
view your work, it leaves lots of room for palettes without things getting too cluttered, there’s also a very large gesture area so you can draw more easily. Now, the MobileStudio Pro is essentially a
Cintiq, it’s just portable, but you can make the Cintiq Pro portable as well. There’s actually a module you can add to it
called the Cintiq Pro Engine which will allow you to turn your Cintiq Pro
into a fully functional computer. Of course, it’s not as portable as the MobileStudio
Pro would be because you’d have to lug around
a large Cintiq and a computer, plus find outlets to power the devices. So if you’re choosing between the MobileStudio
Pro or the Cintiq Pro, you’d really have to ask yourself how much painting you want to
be able to do outside the studio and how much performance matters to you, because obviously a desktop computer with better specs
than the MobileStudio is going to outperform the
MobileStudio. The good thing is, Cintiqs last forever. So if you invest in a Cintiq,
there’s a good chance it’s going to be around for years, maybe even
decades, there are people who are still using
really, really old Cintiq 21UXs. So those are my top five tablets for 2018, but now you’re probably wondering, which of these tablets is best for you? I’ve made it as easy as I possible can to
determine which tablet is right for you by creating kits for different types of artists. Kits are just collections of tablets, software,
and accessories, so hopefully these kits will
point you in the right direction. Now I do want to mention that some of the
questions I get the most are, “Will this tablet work with a certain kind of software, like
Photoshop or Krita?” or “Will it work for certain tasks like
drawing, photo editing, or note taking?” And the answer is: All of these tablets that
I’ve recommended will work for all of these different kinds of tasks. The tablets all do basically the same thing, they just have different features. So what’s most important is the size of the tablet, the features that it offers,
and the quality of the product. What you’re looking at here is a website
called kit.com and this is kit.com/aaronrutten that has all of my recommended product kits. So you can see I have this organized, there’s a whole list of drawing tablets, digital art software, and tablets with a screen,
such as the Cintiqs. If we scroll on down, there are tablet computers
like the MobileStudio Pro, and then there’s my digital artist kit, which are the tools that I use… Wacom pens and accessories, and so on. But if we scroll on down, then we can
see the kits that are for specific types of artists. This is the most affordable kit, so in my
opinion this is the cheapest tablet and software that I would recommend. Moving on we have the digital art beginner
budget kit, which is a little bit more advanced, if you want something that’s more current
you could go with this and it’s still pretty affordable. We also have the digital art beginners kit,
which is again a bit more expensive, and then moving on down
we have the digital art pro budget kit, this is for a professional that’s on a budget, a digital art professional kit, which is for a professional
who’s not on a budget and wants something that’s really,
really good. And then we have the
outdoor digital painter’s kit, this is for people who want to specifically paint outside the studio or outdoors. And then a couple of other kits which we’re
not going to look at. So we’ll scroll on back up and we’ll take
a look at drawing tablets, and you can see,
here are all the drawing tablets that I would recommend. We have the new Intuos 2018 model, we have
the number five pick, which was the Intuos Art medium, but there’s also some options
that I didn’t mention in the video like the Intuos Draw small, which is the small version
of the Intuos Art, and that didn’t make it on the list
just because it’s too small, but it doesn’t mean
that it’s a bad tablet, and if this works for you,
you could certainly check it out. If we scroll on down,
we have the Intuos Pro models. Now, if you’re interested in purchasing one
of these tablets or learning more about it you can always click here on more, and I’ve written a description
for most of these. In some cases there might also be a review that you can play
by going to play video up here. If you want to purchase the tablet or read
more about it you can click on view on Amazon, and that’ll bring up the Amazon page
for that product. Now, I do earn affiliate revenue from purchases that are made here on kit.com/aaronrutten. This revenue allows me to continue to create
free digital art videos like this, so if you found this video helpful buy your tablet with my links. It won’t cost you anything extra, I’ll just get credit for
referring you to the product. So what about Wacom alternatives, aren’t they
just as good? In my opinion, no. And there are many reasons
why I’m not recommending Wacom products in this video. I’ve tried a lot of different tablets, and I feel that quality
is more important than cost in the long run. I don’t want to recommend something that
I don’t stand by 100%. However, this is my opinion, and it’s just
an opinion, so don’t let my opinion stop you
from getting what you can afford. If you can only afford a Wacom alternative
like this, that’s totally fine, you’re still going to be able to enjoy art. I encourage you to research videos that are
for and against the tablet that you’re interested in to get a feel for how that
tablet really performs. I’ve been told that the quality of Wacom alternatives
has improved, but I’m still skeptical. But I am willing to review some of these tablets if that’s what you want to see. You can learn more about how to make that
happen by checking out patreon.com/digitalartreviews. There’s a link in the description of this
video. But come on, there have to be some good Wacom
alternatives, right? Well, there are. There’s the Dell Canvas 27, there’s the Microsoft
Surface Pro and the Microsoft Surface Studio, the iPad Pro… these are all better options
than the really cheap brands like Huion, Ugee, XP Pen, Monoprice, et cetera. However, Wacom is still the best because their
products are designed with artists like you and me in mind. So that’s my list of the top five drawing
tablets to buy in 2018. If you’d like to see more in-depth reviews
of these tablets, subscribe to my channel now
and check out my review playlists. I’ll put a link to those down in the description
of this video. And don’t forget to buy your tablet from kit.com/aaronrutten. Thanks for watching, and I’ll see you next
time.

Dereck Turner

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