The Caper in Aisle 6 @ Circus Flora

The Caper in Aisle 6 @ Circus Flora


Circus Flora has returned to the now semi-permanent
big tent east of Grand. It’s a grand show, an astounding and thrilling
demonstration of all the amazing things the human body can do. As usual, Flora has a story to link the acts. But you may have trouble grasping the full
import of the story unless you happen to find the program near the end of the program booklet
that lists the acts almost in order and has an introductory paragraph explaining that
many eons ago a particle in the air called Aurorium gave humans the ability to fly, which
we lost when it all dissipated. But now a small amount of Aurorium has been
discovered in the basement of a Schnucks store. That has restored the ability to fly in some
of the employees of the store, who go up in the air for The Caper in Aisle 6, as this
edition of the circus is called. First the Nemean Sisters inhale some Aurorium
and then seem almost to float about the suspended ring on which they perform much the usual
routines but with unusual grace and beauty. My favorites are next, the St. Louis Arches. If they don’t actually fly, they do have enough
Aurorium to stay in the air long enough for multiple back flips and close partner acrobatics. The Flying Wallendas are back on the high
wire, keeping us breathless with their balance. The HogDiggityDog performers don’t look like
Schnucks employees – well, the hogs could wind up in one department – nor do they
fly, though the leaping dogs can come close. Trio Bellissimo, luxury shoppers at Schnucks,
luxuriate in their elegant hand balancing and lovely contortions. Master Juggler Kellin follows intermission. I lost count of how many clubs he keeps in
the air – they must have been on Aurorium – and he’s careful to drop one club, just
to prove how difficult it is to do what he does. Caleb Asch, the Daring Horseman, leaps from
horse to horse and through a ring of fire. Duo Ikai soar as they bounce each other off
the teeterboard. The Flying Royals, daring young women and
men on the flying trapeze, ingest, I guess, the most Aurorium. Clowns Matthew Morgan and Mooky Cornish fill
the gaps between the acts. Unfortunately,, much of their humor was verbal,
and given the acoustic challenges of a tent, I missed a lot of it. Mooky did conjure a short musical comedy from
audience volunteers. And Cecil McKinnon’s Yo-Yo the Ringmaster
Clown knows the problem and usually makes herself heard. She’s also the theatre director. Janine Del’Arte directs the music, she and
Miriam Cutler composed it, Margery & Peter Spack designed the scenery, Nina Reed the
costumes, Jesse AlFord the lights, Marta Renzi choreographed, Jack Marsh is the company’s
artistic director. Another exciting evening at Circus Flora.

Dereck Turner

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