GEORGIA RUSSELL 2/3 – Artwork Anatomy

GEORGIA RUSSELL 2/3 – Artwork Anatomy


sometimes it’s annoying to see an artist that you really love because you just think I’m never gonna be able to do something like that’s like Louise Bourgeois for example was always a heroine for me you know and in a way I had to stop the king at her work because it’s so strong and so you know a part of her story that it wasn’t helping me in my own personal work so it’s a funny thing with artists who inspire me I have to be very careful and take myself away from them and forget the outside world [Music] when I first arrived in London it was 1998 yeah in 1998 and it was just at the beginning of the brita recta scene and so sensation was on that the saatchi gallery and you know the Shahrukh and and the whole gang of RIT artists but one that I really was interested in was Crisafulli and he gave a talk at the Royal College and I think we brushed shoulders in the art bar at the Royal College and I think this was very became really real that there was a real discussion about the paintings and about how he developed them and it wasn’t as sensational as the other artists at the time and so that was really inspiring as well to be around this scene that suppose at the time it was very exciting in London I could do anything I wanted at the Royal College you know there the departments are very open to you even though I was in printmaking I could visit the sculpture or painting or ceramics department so you know I started trying everything and you know that can dilute to your work but at the same time it’s important to do it and it wasn’t until nearly the end of my second year that I started they sent me on a residency to Paris I mean I was always drawing I did some video work and printmaking editions and caviar but when I went to Paris I walked along with Seine and noticed all the books and all the same and I bought them to try and learn French and also to draw in and use as my sketchbooks to draw on top of the French text but I also thought there was something really beautiful I’ve never seen books in the open air there was a certain freedom for all these thinkers that were in the books and this kind of exchange between centuries and minds and literature and poetry and all this I’d never seen all whether you see it in book shops with new editions but in the fact that it was all old and be used and shared and then outside of the river flowing beside it and just yet free like free thought I suppose I thought I had to try and maybe do something with those ideas so that’s when I started cutting into the books and making sculptures out of them and my show by degree show which was only maybe about six months after that was a kind of installation with pages of books cut and hanging and really the the beginning of my work which was to become what it is and I always suppose the scalpel was my first tool because my father I’d seen my father using it making models for architecture when I was small so in a way it was almost like a household – and I’d also always noticed that the knife’s that you buy in art shops are never as good as a scalpel I mean they’re they’re okay but they don’t really ever cut quite as precisely or there’s also a little bit of flexibility in a scalpel that it’s really natural like drawing once you start using it to begin with the work really with the incisions into surfaces started thanks to the the books and then I started using it on photographs or maps or even currencies because I was taking historical or used things and kind of bringing them back to the forefront for us to assess and look at again see if they’re important to us or how they can change when they’re brought out of the past and like books people are very distressed sometimes if they see that I have dissected and made a sculpture out of a book but the whole point is saying that it’s never a rare book it’s saying look at me am i important to you what do I mean to you what is a story what is written culture and it’s more like a celebration or a kind of growing garden of literature this sculpture that’s very organic and form so yes I started cutting and trying to do the same things and to found photographs I’d find in junk shops and making them really big and cutting them into kind of lace like nets suspended so these are again kind of memories that are becoming like webs that we can’t quite fix in time they’re always moving and disintegrating and renewing and then after a while I realized that it was me that needed to control what I was cutting as well you know why was I cutting these find objects what if it was something that I had made it’s almost like this slightly auto destructive act as well which is quite interesting so I decided that really to get even further I would make my own things and then destroy them myself so it became my gesture destroyed by another gesture or not or even not destroyed opened up even so that I could see the stages of my destruction or taking a part of something so the recent work has become more like keeping a trace of the stages of a painting so there’s the first layer of the painting which we see through the next layer of the painting so that’s almost like taking apart yeah the phases and the stages of a painting I think it was a Picasso got his wife to actually copy every stage off a painting he was doing so that he could remember what stages were before but he painted on top of it again before it came something became something else and I think I’ve always been interested in the kind of time [Music] and stages of a painting and what’s underneath one layer what we can’t see anymore in a painting [Music]

Dereck Turner

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