Conservation Framing: 10 – Glass

Conservation Framing: 10 – Glass


This is the video number 10 of the course
of conservation framing carried out by Rinaldin. The course is edited and presented by Mal
Reynolds who is a recognized authority in this field. You will recall that when we were talking
about normal conditions one of those normal conditions was out of direct sunlight and that it is most pervasive and difficult to avoid. What I want to mention is a type of glass
that we should be using in a conservation framing and that is conservation glass which has a UV filter. Ultraviolet radiation is one of the most damaging
aspects of light and the damaging frequencies are between 300 and 390 nanometers and they
cause all sort of problems and so by filtering out that ultraviolet radiation then we can
reduce fading and the damage light causes. There are three types of conservation glass
made by TrueView, a United States company. The first is conservation clear, the second
is conservation reflection control and the third is museum. All of these have a ultraviolet coating on
them which blocks out ultraviolet rays up to round about 97%. The difference between them is the light transmission
and light reflection. Light transmission for both the conservation
clear and conservation reflection control is round about 90% whereas that for Museum
is 96%. But, more importantly, light reflection is
8% for conservation clear and reflection control and 1% for Museum glass. This frame shows the difference between 3
glasses. This is conservation clear, the middle one
is the museum and the one on the right hand side here, is conservation reflection control. If I just move this around, you will actually
see the difference between the glass. When you actually visit your picture frame
supplier you will actually see the sort of demonstration on your wall and it will help
you choose which glasses you would like. You will see on the bottom of this piece of
conservation clear glass that it has some writing and the writing says that this side
faces the artwork, score the opposite side. That means the ultraviolet coating is on the
side that faces the artwork so you don’t want to score down that side because if you do,
you stand a chance of tearing the ultraviolet coating so you should always score from the
opposite side as it is said on the glass. You will find all the products for conservation framing in our web site.

Dereck Turner

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