An Altered Patina Frame; A time-lapsed Tutorial

An Altered Patina Frame; A time-lapsed Tutorial


Hi everyone! It has been a while and
today I’m glad to show you how to alter a photo frame from Ikea using the patina
paint set from Finnabair in this time-lapse tutorial. So let’s get started! I’m using these two floral dies from Sizzix to create some flowers for the frame using
the bronze metallic paper from the kraft core collection. I don’t think this is in
production anymore. However, there are other suppliers which
produce similar metallic papers and I would think that copper is a better
description of the colour not necessary bronze has described in the package that
I’m using which I will link it in the description box below for alternative
supplies of such metallic papers. The making of the tiny florals are pretty
straightforward. All you need to do is to roll them in place using the quilling tool
provided in the die set and over here I’m using three different sizes of tiny
roses and what I’m doing is to roll them together in place and then after that I
will glue everything down together. The Rose however is a little tricky to
assemble even I have watched the online tutorial by Susan Tierney-Cockburn. You still need some practice to get the ideal rose shape you want. It took me a while to figure out the
various petal shapes and for each petal I just I die-cut them in about 5 to 6 pieces each. So before I glue them down I’m using my
hands and fingers to shape them in place since it’s a little easier as the
metallic paper is slightly stiffer from the normal cardstock. So over here I’m building a base by
placing the large petals down first onto the calyx and then the bud in the centre. And very randomly without knowing
how the rose will look like, I just place the rest of the petals down layer by layer. So I got this really funny floral shape
that probably needs some reshaping and readjustment so while the glue is drying
I try to reshape and adjust the petals till I can see a rose. And here are the rest of the tiny roses. I remove the backing and the inserts
from the frame and apply a layer of clear gesso all over the frame including
the grooves and valleys in between the design, making sure the entire frame is well gessoed. I’m using the brass paint as my base
for the patina effect. You can use either the blue or the green paste from the
set which has a thicker and rougher texture or whichever you’re comfortable
with. There’s isn’t a hard and fast rule for this. The reason why I’m choosing the
brass paint as the base is because I prefer to build up the texture gradually
from a smooth surface. So what I’m actually doing right here is to paint
around the frame without thinking too much on how consistent the paint will
be like on the surface. Because after building of the patina using the other
two pastes, you can’t really see the uneven of the paint underneath.
Sometimes a little messy and uneven imperfection will tend to bring up the best result at
the end of the day. I’m using a pointed brush for this as I feel that it’s easier
to reach in between the grooves and the valleys of the design around the frame. After the base is done, I start to build up
the patina texture using the blue paste. The paste has a rather thick and sandy
texture therefore you don’t actually need a lot to begin with. It is also
advisable to add the paste bit by bit, and gradually build up the texture layer
by layer. Because I want to tone down the brass base yet I do want to show the
tone of the colour underneath, which will give a rather aged and
oxidised effect, I dilute the blue paste by dipping my brush with some water and
just spread it across the frame. As you can see, I don’t really use lot as
I spread through the blue paste onto the frame and I only use slightly more on the surface of the design randomly on certain spots, as well as the corners around the window of the frame. The green paste is the heaviest paste of
all among the three. It has this very rough and thick texture which gives a
very sandy effect upon application. I should say it’s actually more sandy and
more rough compared to the blue paste as you can see here, I actually don’t need a
lot to begin with to build up the texture. The thumb of rule is always start
working your way up bit by bit a layer at a time. You can always add more after
that or switch in between the colours of your choice. If you need to tone down the
colours, dilute them with some water. The key here is not so much in creating
a perfect patina but rather more towards in building up the effect. I realized I need one more rose and have
made a smaller one using the Rose die from Susan’s garden collection. While I
was compiling my supplies list, I noticed that this Rose die, very
unfortunately, has already been retired and no longer in production. Before I fix all my roses down what I’m doing here is to arrange them in the places I want and
once I’m happy with the arrangement, I’ll glue them down using E6000. The reason
why I use E6000 is because of its flexibility and durability, though this
glue tend to emit a vapour that smells and it’s a potential health hazard.
So do ensure you use this glue in a well-ventilated environment. I have done have a lovely sentiment to
go with this patina frame which I have more pictures over my blog. Therefore, do
pop by my blog for more details. Link to my blog for this project is stated in
the description box below. I also have listed down the various supplies
I used for this project and links to where to get them from as well. I hope
you have enjoyed this tutorial and if you love what I have shared here, do give me a
thumb up and remember to share and subscribe. Thanks for watching and I
shall see you soon again!

Dereck Turner

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