Amazing Beautiful Historic Apollo Launch Photos

Amazing Beautiful Historic Apollo Launch Photos


Ignition sequence starts:
five, four, we have ignition, all engines are running, we have liftoff, we have liftoff at seven a.m. Eastern Standard Time. The tower has been cleared, the tower has been cleared They said it couldn’t be done, to take a 60 second time exposure photograph of a Saturn 5 rocket launch in color in the daytime facing directly into a blazing Florida sunrise. I am Ed Bernd Jr.
and I love doing things that people say can’t be done so I went ahead and did it anyway. It’s easy with black and white: Just use infrared film and a dark red
filter that turns a sky dark so the exhaust from the rocket leaves a beautiful trail through the sky. Color is another matter, so I had to try and see if it would work. That was more than 50 years ago in November of 1967. 1968 had been a very difficult year in the United States. There were assassinations and riots and
young men being killed every day in a war in Southeast Asia that we knew we
couldn’t win, so when NASA sent astronauts to circle the moon, on
Christmas Eve, I had to take a picture of that. The astronauts inspired us with their
message on Christmas Eve. For all the people back on earth, the crew of Apollo 8 have a message we would like to send to you: In the beginning, God created the heaven and the earth… The Apollo 11 launch in July of 1969 was the biggest
event in the history of humanity, in my humble opinion, so of course I had to take a picture of
that. I wanted to do something different and it might be the only picture of its
kind that you’ll ever see. I have never seen another double exposure photograph
of the Apollo 11 rocket right after launch on its way to the moon
superimposed against a picture of the moon. Nobody will ever have a chance to do it again because you can only do the first one time, and that was the first
flight to land men on the moon. That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind. The Apollo program came to an end with the midnight launch of Apollo 17 in November of 1972. I decided to photograph that one
with another time exposure against the remnants of the old Canova pier jutting
out into the Atlantic Ocean. That picture turned out more spectacular than I ever
could have imagined. You can read about it and how surprised I was and how it
wasn’t at all what I expected. Sometimes it’s good to be lucky. Each of those launch photos had their own particular challenges you can read about
it you can download pictures for free suitable for use on a digital photo
frame or on your computer at ApolloLaunchPhotos.com. Thank you

Dereck Turner

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *